How to Work the York Stitch using F1 and F2

How to Work the York Stitch using F1 and F2

Nalbinding is the process of continually sewing a series of loose knots to make a fabric for any number of items from socks and mittens to dresses.  Though many people think of it as a northern European art; as a skill, nalbinding has been dated back at least as early as 4th century Egypt, .

There are several beauties to this craft.  The first is that it only requires a single blunt needle and yarn to make a project.  The second is; though a bit more time consuming than knitting,  a dropped stitch does not result in the unraveling of the work.  There are also a number of stitch techniques which result in a variety of textures.

The York stitch presented in this video by Petra (www.youtube.com/user/pittyom) is a reasonably basic technique.  It is frequently attributed to what is believed to be a 10th century sock made with the stitch discovered at the Coppergate dig in Jorvik/York, England.  The stitch is diagrammed using what is known using Hansen’s classification as UU/OOO.  In other words under under / over over over.  The F1 and F2 as explained by Petra in the video is a reference to the method of connecting to the next row.

An image of the Coppergate sock can be found through the York Archaeological Trust at http://www.jorvik-viking-centre.co.uk/gallery/

Click once to view the video.

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